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Edgar Degas, Woman Leaving Her Bath, 1888

 (image 1)
Artist Edgar Degas (1834 - 1917)
Title Woman Leaving Her Bath, 1888
Medium Original Lithograph in Chine Collé on Hand Made Fibrous Paper
Image Size 15 in x 11 in (38 cm x 28 cm)
Framed Size 30 in x 27 1/4 in (76.2 cm x 69.2 cm)
Edition From the edition of 25, hand-signed by Edgar Degas (Paris, 1834- Paris, 1917).
Signature Hand signed by Edgar Degas (Paris, 1834- Paris, 1917) in pencil in the lower left margin and also hand signed by G.W. Thornley in pencil in the lower right margin.
Condition This work is in excellent condition with exquisite detail and delicate tonal value.
Gallery Price Sold
Questions?
ID # w-3060

Created in 1888, this work was produced by William Thornley, with whom Degas (Paris, 1834- Paris, 1917) often collaborated, and based on a pastel done by Degas. This piece is hand-signed by Edgar Degas (Paris, 1834- Paris, 1917) in pencil in the lower left margin and also hand signed by G.W. Thornley in pencil in the lower right margin. From the edition of 25, hand-signed by Edgar Degas (Paris, 1834- Paris, 1917).

This piece benchmarks Degas' (Paris, 1834- Paris, 1917) later work, that is often heralded for his interesting takes on an old subject, that of the nude female. In taking pains to depict an anatomically perfect female who obeys the laws of proportions, Degas' lost none of her soft, quiet, unblemished and austere beauty. What is so special about this piece is perhaps Degas' ability to synthesize ideas so eloquently. A thorough investigation of the human form, an irregular composition, and an emphasis on delicate lines depict a delicate, distinctly female form, exiting her bath.

Simultaneously classical and modern, Degas' (Paris, 1834- Paris, 1917) later works are a beautiful blend of human anatomy and genre. His painstaking depictions of the female form placed against the background of private daily routine results in works that are part investigation of human structure and part peeps into the private routines of turn of the century women. In these later works our viewpoint has shifted to eyelevel where we come one on one with the figure that comes to dominate the composition. In suppressing his pallet, Degas' focuses our attention not to gaudy color combinations, but on the beauty of a simple if not elegant line, further glorifying the beauty of the subject. Yet in his delicate renderings, Degas spared no details, and we are allowed an investigation of light as it bounces off of her shoulders, legs and back, while her outstretched arms reach for her peignoir. In delving into old themes and varying his medium, viewpoint, and compositions, Degas revealed the progression of his artistic aspiration to reveal what was simultaneously common and beautiful. It is his self-consciously classical treatment of these women during their daily routines, which underscores their beauty, if not their importance.
DOCUMENTED AND ILLUSTRATED IN:

1. Kendall Richard, Degas Beyond Impressionism, National Gallery Publications, London, 1996. Listed as Figure 32 on page 41.

2. Boggs, Degas, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, 1988. Listed as figure 250 on page 418.

About the Framing:
Museum grade conservation framed in a complementary moulding with silk mats and optical grade Plexiglas.

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