Frank Stella and Moby Dick: A Whale of an Imagination

Stella Before Moby Dick

Frank Stella is well known for his minimalist style. In his early years as an artist, his austere Black Paintings transformed the way viewers experienced color, form and the environment. Yet, later in his career, Stella’ style drastically evolved into abstraction and three dimensional forms. Between the years 1985 and 1993, Stella produced a vast number of works inspired by Herman Melville’s Moby-Dick.

Frank Stella working on a Black Painting

The works are included within series such as The Waves, The Waves II and Moby-Dick Domes. Stella’s fascination with the novel spans various mediums, from collage and print to aluminum sculpture. In total, there are 138 artworks, each corresponding to a chapter within Moby-Dick. Upon first glance, it is clear that these works are a departure from Stella’s beginnings. Often, geometric forms curve and swirl, layered in collage form. The colors are incredibly vibrant and add to the illusion of multiple dimensions.

 

Moby-Dick and Themes

However, to understand Stella’s works, it is imperative to understand the significance of the Moby-Dick. Melville’s novel details a nautical journey led by Ahab, a one-legged ship captain. Ahab’s main ambition is to kill Moby Dick, the whale who devoured his leg. As such, death, fate and ambition are central themes to the novel. At once, it is possible to imagine the drama that unfolds in this journey. For a more thorough plot analysis of the novel: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moby-Dick 

Frank Stella's Moby Dick: Words and Shapes

Frank Stella’s Moby Dick: Words and Shapes

 

Stella’s Inspiration

Inspiration for the series is rooted both in respect for his predecessors and his admiration of the book. For instance, Stella has always held the abstract expressionists in high regard. Of these artists, Stella has said “they’re still the generation I admire. This is paying my debt, or not so much paying my debt as expressing my admiration for the abstract generation I grew up with and that I admired the most, and that I still admire (Jones).” Indeed, the swirling colors and abstract shapes of this series harken back to the recognizable style of the abstract expressionists such as Hans Hoffman  and Franz Kline.

Franz Kline, Mahoning, 1956, Whitney Museum of American Art Permanent Collection

Franz Kline, Mahoning, 1956, Whitney Museum of American Art Permanent Collection

Franz Hoffman, Chimera, 1959

Hans Hoffman, Chimera, 1959

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In Stella’s Own Words

Additionally, the drama within the novel played a great part in his vision. In a recent interview, Stella explained “I think the Moby Dick series [1986-1997] is a kind of turning point. I was a little afraid, and probably still am a little, with Moby Dick, but the pictures [are] essentially curved surfaces. They started to really move, and the novel moves; you’re going around the world, it’s pretty wet, there are a lot of waves and motion (Pobric).” In this manner, Stella creates a visual narrative as powerful as its original textual form. Rather than create literal depictions of the chapters, Stella astounds viewers by envisioning the soul of the novel.

 

Stella and Moby Dick

The Waves Series

Title: Ahab’s Leg (From the Waves), 1989 Medium: Color Screenprint, Lithograph and Linoleum, with Hand Colouring and Collage on Saunders Wove Paper

Title: Ahab’s Leg (From the Waves), 1989
Medium: Color Screenprint, Lithograph and Linoleum, with Hand Colouring and Collage on Saunders Wove Paper

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Detailed Image of Ahab’s Leg (From the Waves), 1989

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Waves II Series

Title: The Quarter Deck from The Waves II, 1985-1989 Medium: Color screenprint, lithograph and linocut with hand-coloring and collage on T.H. Saunders paper

Title: The Quarter Deck from The Waves II, 1985-1989 Medium: Color screenprint, lithograph and linocut with hand-coloring and collage on T.H. Saunders paper

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Detailed Image of The Quarter Deck from The Waves II, 1985-1989

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Moby Dick Domes

Title: The funeral (dome), from the Moby Dick domes, 1992 Medium: Relief-printed etching, aquatint and engraving in colors on TGL handmade paper

Title: The funeral (dome), from the Moby Dick domes, 1992
Medium: Relief-printed etching, aquatint and engraving in colors on TGL handmade paper

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Detailed Image of The funeral (dome), from the Moby Dick domes, 1992

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Works Cited

  1. Jones, Jonathan. “Father of Minimalism, Frank Stella, on Moby Dick.” The Guardian. Guardian News and Media, 04 Apr. 2001. Web. 16 Mar. 2016.
  2. Pobric, Pac. “Frank Stella: A Romantic, after All.” Frank Stella: A Romantic, after All. The Art Newspaper, Nov. 2015. Web. 16 Mar. 2016.

 

 

Suggested Stella artworks:


  • Talladega Three III (from Circuits Series), 1982
    Frank Stella
    Circuits Series
    REQUEST PRICE/SUBMIT BEST OFFER
    Item # 4992

  • Illustrations after El Lissitzsky’s Had Gadya Series: A Hungry Cat Ate Up the Goat, 1984
    Frank Stella
    Mixed Media Print
    REQUEST PRICE/SUBMIT BEST OFFER
    Item # 5321

  • The Pacific, 1988, from The Waves I, 1985-1989
    Frank Stella
    Hand Signed Silkscreen with Lithograph and Linocut, with handcoloring, marbling, and collage for sale
    REQUEST PRICE/SUBMIT BEST OFFER
    W-5841

  • Jonah Historically Regarded from Moby Dick Engravings, 1991
    Frank Stella
    Color etching, aquatint, relief, drypoint and screenprint
    REQUEST PRICE/SUBMIT BEST OFFER
    W-5700

  • The Butcher Came and Slew the Ox, Pl.8 from Illustrations after El Lissitzky’s Had Gadya, 1984
    Frank Stella
    Color screen print, lithograph and linocut with hand-coloring and collage.
    REQUEST PRICE/SUBMIT BEST OFFER
    W-5620

  • Imola Five II, from Circuits, 1983
    Frank Stella
    Hand Signed Woodcut for sale
    $35,000.00 $27,000.00
    Item # 5870

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