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Miro, L'Oiseau-fusée vise la fourche,1952

Joan Miro, La Calebasse (The Gourd), 1969

Miro Etching Aquatint Carborundum Signed, La Calebasse (The Gourd), 1969 Signed Joan Miro Etching Aquatint Carborundum, La Calebasse (The Gourd), 1969

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Miro Etching Aquatint Carborundum Signed, La Calebasse (The Gourd), 1969 (image 1) Miro Etching Aquatint Carborundum Signed, La Calebasse (The Gourd), 1969 (image 2) Miro Etching Aquatint Carborundum Signed, La Calebasse (The Gourd), 1969 (image 3) Miro Etching Aquatint Carborundum Signed, La Calebasse (The Gourd), 1969 (image 4)

Visualize Its Scale and Beauty in Different Contexts:

Miro Etching Aquatint Carborundum Signed, La Calebasse (The Gourd), 1969 (image in room 1)
Miro Etching Aquatint Carborundum Signed, La Calebasse (The Gourd), 1969 (image in room 2)
Miro Etching Aquatint Carborundum Signed, La Calebasse (The Gourd), 1969 (image in room 4)
Miro Etching Aquatint Carborundum Signed, La Calebasse (The Gourd), 1969 (image in room 7)
Miro Etching Aquatint Carborundum Signed, La Calebasse (The Gourd), 1969 (image in room 8)
Miro Etching Aquatint Carborundum Signed, La Calebasse (The Gourd), 1969 (image in room 10)
Artist: Miro, Joan (1893 - 1983)
Title: La Calebasse (The Gourd), 1969
Reference: D. 488
Medium:
Original Color Etching & Aquatint with Carborundum
Image Size: 36 1/4 in x 23 in (92 cm x 58.5 cm)
Sheet Size: 36 1/4 in x 23 in (92 cm x 58.5 cm)
Framed Size: 55 in x 43 in (139.7 cm x 109.2 cm)
Signed: This work is hand-signed by Joan Miró (1893-1983) in pencil in the lower right hand side of the work.
Edition: This work is numbered 66/75 (from the total edition of 75 plus some artist's proofs) in pencil in the lower left.
Condition: This work is in excellent condition, a bold impression with bright, vibrant colors. The Carborundum is very deep and rich with a lot of texture throughout the area of black.
Gallery Price:
Item# 3336
SOLD, but we have similar works in our Miro collection!
Historical Description of This Work:
Appropriately entitled La Calebasse, or The Gourd, the viewer is instantly drawn in by the striking black silhouette of a large gourd in the center of the composition. Cupped between two horizontal lines, the gourd appears animated as its curved limb appears as an exterior body part, waving through the air. The black lines contribute a sense of architectural structure, connecting and juxtaposing at ninety degree angles. In the background, Miro utilizes a myriad of colors in tie die splatters with Miró's playful star and arrow-like forms flitting about. This is a Miró to be viewed in person, as its surface and textural quality cannot be duly translated through digital photography. The size of the piece adds to the overall effect of the work; the image extends beyond the plate mark along the lower left and bottom margin, reaching the extreme sheet edge.

Created in 1969, this etching & aquatint with Carborundum is signed in pencil by Joan Miró (Barcelona, 1893 - Palma, 1983) in the lower right. This piece is published by Maeght éditeur, Paris and printed by Morsang, Paris on Arches wove paper. This work is numbered 66/75 (from the total edition of 75 plus some artist's proofs).

DOCUMENTED AND ILLUSTRATED IN:

1. Dupin, Jacques. Miró Engraver, vol. II 1961 - 1973, Rizzoli: New York, 1989. Listed and illustrated as catalogue raisonné no. 488 on pg. 137.
2. Musée d'Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris. Miró - l'œuvre graphique, Paris, 1974. Listed in this catalogue raisonné as cat. no. 131 on pg. 42.

ABOUT THE FRAMING:
Museum grade conservation framed in a complementary moulding with silk mats and optical grade Plexiglas.

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Style: Surrealism, 20th Century Modern Surrealist Spanish Master
Miro Etching Aquatint Carborundum Signed, La Calebasse (The Gourd), 1969
Miro Etching Aquatint Carborundum Signed, La Calebasse (The Gourd), 1969
Miro Etching Aquatint Carborundum Signed, La Calebasse (The Gourd), 1969
Miro Etching Aquatint Carborundum Signed, La Calebasse (The Gourd), 1969
Miro Etching Aquatint Carborundum Signed, La Calebasse (The Gourd), 1969
Miro Etching Aquatint Carborundum Signed, La Calebasse (The Gourd), 1969
Miro Etching Aquatint Carborundum Signed, La Calebasse (The Gourd), 1969
Miro Etching Aquatint Carborundum Signed, La Calebasse (The Gourd), 1969
Miro Etching Aquatint Carborundum Signed, La Calebasse (The Gourd), 1969
Miro Etching Aquatint Carborundum Signed, La Calebasse (The Gourd), 1969
Miro Etching Aquatint Carborundum Signed, La Calebasse (The Gourd), 1969

Joan Miro Biography

Joan MiroJoan Miro (1893 - 1983)

Combining Abstract Art with Surrealism, Joan Miró's oeuvre is internationally respected. Born April 20, 1893, in Barcelona, Spain, Joan Miró Ferra was exposed to art at an early age through his watchmaker father. At the age of 14, he went to business school in Barcelona while also attending La Lonja's Escuela Superior de Artes Industriales y Bellas Artes. Choosing business over art, he took a position as a clerk, but suffered a nervous breakdown. Abandoning business, he resumed his art studies and attended Francesc Galí's Escola d'Art in Barcelona from 1912 to 1915. Receiving early encouragement from the dealer José Dalmau, Miró's first show occurred at his gallery in 1918 where his work was ridiculed and defaced. His works during this time reflected the influence of Fauvism and folkloric Catalan art as is seen in Chapel of Sant Joan d'Horta (1917), but he was also drawn to Cubism and Surrealism. 

Those artistic interests led Miró to move to Paris in 1920, but he continued to spend his summers in Catalonia. In Paris, Miró met Pablo Picasso, and other important emerging artists and poets, encircling himself with creative types. Dalmau organized Miró's first solo show in Paris, at the Galerie la Licorne in 1921 and his work was included in the Salon d'Automne of 1923. Strongly symbolic and poetic in nature, Miró's art fit well within the context of the dream-like erratic tendencies espoused by Surrealism and in 1924 he joined the Surrealist group, though always remained on the periphery of Surrealism. Such works included Catalan Landscape (The Hunter) (1923) and the Tilled Field (1924).

This is around the time Miró began to develop an antagonistic attitude towards painting, and started to explore other techniques and mediums. In 1926, while collaborating with Max Ernst on designs for a ballet they pioneered the technique of grattage, in which pigment is troweled onto the canvas and in 1928 Miró began executing his first papiers collés and collages. During the early 1930s, Miró would delve into sculpture, incorporating painted stones and found objects into his three-dimensional works. This was also the time when he started his experiments in lithography, and his first etchings date to 1933, both mediums of which would comprise a majority of his oeuvre. 

Joan Miró Etchings:
By 1930, Miró had developed his own unique style of imagery derived from elements of Catalan folk art and the art of children and this was suited wonderfully for the etching medium as the fluid line work and fanciful figures enabled him to create crisp details. A constant experimenter however, the etchings are a wonderful precursor of what was to come for his printmaking skills later in his life. 

Finding international success, with the opening of the Pierre Matisse Gallery in New York, Miró became an influential part of the Modern Art Movement in America. With the outbreak of the Spanish Civil War however in 1936, Miró had to flee Spain and remained in France where he was commissioned to create a monumental work for the Paris World's Fair. Then World War II broke out and he was forced to relocate to Normandy, then fled back to Spain in 1940. During this time, Miró created his famous twenty-three gouache series Constellations (1940).

The Museum of Modern Art, New York held Miró's first major museum retrospective in 1941, and that same year Miró began working in ceramics with Josep Lloréns y Artigas. Always trying to find new ways to express himself, it was during 1948–49 when Miró lived in Barcelona, and made frequent visits to Paris that he began to experiment with his printmaking techniques at the Mourlot Studios and the Atelier Lacourière. Such printmaking techniques would result in his later mastering of aquatints and carborundum, some of the most difficult graphic works to create. 

Joan Miró Lithographs:
Miró's close relationship with Fernand Mourlot resulted in the creation of over one thousand different lithographic editions. His process of automatic drawing, allowing the hand to move randomly on the surface, leaving the artwork to chance, enabled him to create works that were genuine reflections of himself, an integral part of his popularity. A popularity that still remains today as they make for 91% of all of his works bought on the market, with a complete set of Le lézard aux Plumes d'Or (1971) selling for over $147, 510 in 2002 from Christie's.

A true master of the printmaking medium, Miró received the Grand Prize for Graphic Work at the Venice Biennale in 1954, and his work was included in the first Documenta exhibition in Kassel the following year. In 1958, he was given a Guggenheim International Award for murals for the UNESCO building in Paris and the following year he resumed painting, initiating a series of mural-sized canvases. During the 1960s, he began to work intensively in sculpture and was particularly captivated by glass as is evidenced in his commissioned mural Personnage Oiseaux (1972-1978) which combines one million pieces of marble and Venetian glass. A man whose art rose to international acclaim with the help of the Surrealist movement, Miró was honored with many retrospectives during his lifetime and worked until he passed away of heart disease in December 25, 1983, in Palma de Mallorca, Spain. 

Joan Miró Aquatints:
With his most coveted etching and aquatint Équinoxe (1967) selling for $74,000 in 2007 and the series Michel Leiris, Fissures (1969) that sold for $92,500 in 2001 at Christies, Miró's aquatints are quite valuable. In the experimentation that followed his lithographs, Miró produced hundreds of aquatints, a process that presents variations of darkness on the paper. These experiments allowed for him to better represent the dualities and contradictions within his artwork. 

Joan Miró Carborundum:
A method of printmaking that produces variations of dotted effects, Miró embraced this medium as it allowed him to create works that were rich in texture and variety. Trying not to adhere to any artistic movement during the 1970s, this method proved diverse as it gave him an artistic range when combined with the etching and aquatint. With the series such as Barcelona (1972-1973) selling for over $72,500 in 2005 and the work Les grandes manoeuvres (1973) selling for over $52,000 in 2010, this medium makes for some of his most valuable in printmaking.

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